Almost Levenson Chapter 7 and 8

Chapter 7 Levenson seems competent

I agree with Beth. (this time)

Levinson on Facebook actually started out as a MySpace vs. Facebook debate which seemed pointless to me. Maybe three years ago when this book was written this question was useful. link

Not wanting to waste my dear readers time we shall say no more of chapter 7. My apologies if you feel cheated in any way.

Chapter 8 Twitter

Levenson, when referring to “total immersion” said

“Mobile media, to the contrary, work against this immersion. If we’re looking at Wikipedia or YouTube or writing a blog from a mobile device, we are usually more in touch with the outside world, and with people around us, than if we are engaging those media from a desktop computer.”

I disagree with Levenson’s stance on a immersion and mobile devices.

In order to fully give credit to my argument we must mention the dreaded chapter 7. Bear with me as we step backward in time.

Chapter 7

James the brown-noser was asking about “information overload” Levenson responded by saying

“I do not think “overload” is the problem we face; the challenge is how to cope with “information underload,” or not enough information to get the most out of new new media to successfully navigate the Web. Human are, after all inherently multitasking organisms.”

Chapter 8

Sorry again for that, we are now able to continue with all due diligence.

Immediacy and timeliness deserved more.

“This means that Twitter is not only the most immediate written medium in history…”

The End

Getting back to the beginning, and the matter of my disagreement with Levenson. Mobile media’s effect in immersion really depends on context.

Questions

Does constant access delivered by Mobile media trump the advantages of a desktop in regards to immersion?

Levenson believes humans are natural multi-taskers. If we are able to multi-task could we then mix networks our virtual social world with real life? If so, would we then be technically more immersed in our technology?

Can you see mobile devices creating a world were we can’t help but be immersed 24/7?

Answers I have none

To participate one must have a sence of “Immediacy”.  At this stage; a post on Rettberg chapter 1 would matter, but lack relevance. There is regret in my mind at my lack of timeliness. Keep in mind the Morgan Factor.

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About ebinkert

I've decided to give up trying to be informative. Now I think I will just ask questions.
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6 Responses to Almost Levenson Chapter 7 and 8

  1. Pingback: Levenson Post | The Daybook

  2. Kevin says:

    I agree with you completely on your analysis of this statement: “Mobile media, to the contrary, work against this immersion. If we’re looking at Wikipedia or YouTube or writing a blog from a mobile device, we are usually more in touch with the outside world, and with people around us, than if we are engaging those media from a desktop computer.” Who is less engaged with the world than someone plugging away on their mobile media device? People walk out in front of moving trucks because they are texting. If you want to be “in touch with the outside world, and with people around us”, leave your mobile device at home, or at least in your pocket. I first went to college back in the eighties, and then, before class, students engaged in conversation, now before classes classrooms are often as silent as tombs, because students are texting instead of talking to each other. The last thing they’re being is social.

    Are we really supposed to define “social” as interaction only with people who are nowhere near you?

  3. Pingback: almost Levenson chapters 8 and 7 | No answers

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